Latinos Speak Out About Lack of Diversity In NYC Arts, Cultural Groups

CCCADI’s Innovative Cultural Advocacy Fellowship cultivates current and future arts workers of color and creates a powerful pipeline toward leadership positions. Apply now for spring 2016! 

CCCADI’s Innovative Cultural Advocacy Fellowship cultivates current and future arts workers of color and creates a powerful pipeline toward leadership positions. Apply now for spring 2016! 

Did you know that the first nationwide survey of diversity in American art museums shows NO pipeline toward leadership positions for so-called minorities? 

Today (February 2nd, 2016), NBCNews published an article highlighting the response of notable Latino Art/Cultural institutional directors, responding to the lack of diversity in NYC Art/Cultural groups and institutions. 

 

FEB 2 2016, 9:23 AM ET
Latinos Speak Out About Lack of Diversity In NYC Arts, Cultural Groups
by RAUL A. REYES for NBCNews Latino
NEW YORK, NY -- New York City is celebrated worldwide for its cultural offerings, in everything from theater to art to dance. But a new report reveals that the city's arts groups are actually far less diverse than the populations they serve.

A recently released survey by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs showed that while the city's arts groups are more diverse than other organizations on the national level, they are far from reflective of the city's demographics.

The work force at New York City art organizations is 62 percent white; in contrast, the U.S. Census Bureau notes that only 33 percent of city residents are white. The remainder of the arts groups' work force broke down as 15 percent African-American, 10 percent Latino, and 7 percent Asian.

For their report, researchers surveyed nearly one thousand nonprofit arts organizations that receive city funding.

To Marta Moreno Vega, founder of the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute, these finding were not a surprise. "What the report does is put numbers and more specific information out there, which is good," she said. "Basically, it affirms what we already know. You can go to any of the so-called major institutions and just look around and see the lack of people of color in executive and decision-making positions. You tend to see more of our people in security and maintenance."
Read More [Here]