Barrio Art, Music and Popular Culture

El Barrio Is Home

| By
Tamiko Thiel

Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute (CCCADI), 120 E. 125th St.

El Barrio Is Home features the work of Mi Querido Barrio?s artistic advisor, Tamiko Thiel.

Using a participatory process, Thiel wanted her AR project to give East Harlem residents the opportunity to share with others what their community means to them. When the augment is activated, viewers will be surrounded and embraced by personal words of gold from the proud community of El Barrio!

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Scan the upper stories of the CCCADI building. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Tamiko Thiel
Tamiko Thiel

Artistic Advisor for Mi Querido Barrio

?Since I am not from El Barrio myself, when Dr. Marta Moreno Vega kindly invited me to be the artistic advisor for CCCADI?s augmented reality exhibition and to contribute an AR work of my own, I wanted to use a participatory process that enabled residents of El Barrio to speak through my artwork. I therefore asked people to write words or short phrases?by hand?that expressed their feelings for El Barrio. I transformed these into "gilt" letters, preserving the personal handwriting of each phrase, and placed them in a hovering cloud in front of the newly restored firehouse that is the new home of CCCADI. When visitors view this augment, they will be surrounded and embraced by personal words of gold from the proud community of El Barrio!?

Tamiko Thiel is an internationally known visual artist and acknowledged pioneer in developing the dramatic and poetic capabilities of virtual reality (since 1994) and augmented reality (since 2010) to create spaces of memory for exploring social and cultural issues. Her work often deals with crossing boundaries, drawing extensively on her own cross-cultural experiences as an American of mixed German and Japanese descent living in Japan, the United States, and Germany. Images of the garden as a lost paradise appear in many of her works, and issues of global warming and climate change are increasingly becoming a concern in her art practice.

A founding member of artist group Manifest.AR, she participated in their path-breaking augmented reality guerrilla intervention at MoMA in New York in 2010, and was the chief curator and organizer of their uninvited intervention at the Venice Biennale in 2011. for which she helped write the proposal for the Rockefeller Foundation Cultural Innovation Award for the CCCADI project Mi Querido Barrio, before serving as the augmented reality artistic adviser for the exhibition.

Barrio Art, Music and Popular Culture

Fiestas De La Cruz

| By
Edwin Pag

Los Pleneros de la 21, 1680 Lexington Ave.

Fiestas De La Cruz AR project, or Feast of the Holy Cross, features an annual catholic religious celebration vigorously celebrated through the Caribbean, South and Central America. The observance was brought to the Caribbean by Spanish conquistadores during the 1500s. More than five hundred years later the tradition is still alive in East Harlem thanks to the community based organization and music ensemble, Los Pleneros de la 21. Through video clips, viewers will enjoy of a visual and interactive experience that will expand their knowledge about these festivities.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: : If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Edwin Pag
Edwin Pag

?Over the last thirty years, my creative focus working as a photojournalist, documentary photographer, and graphic designer has been on documenting common communal experiences, especially those customs that are on the verge of disappearing from the cultural fabric of the community as a result of changing regional economic and racial demographics, due to the original influx of forced migration or the current-day exodus as a result of gentrification.

Starting in the South Bronx in the 1980s, and continuing today in Spanish Harlem, I have been assessing the historical and cultural inventory in these two communities through my visual work from an insider?s point-of-view via a process I call ?Cultural Identity Reclamation.? The goal of this work is to validate, solidify, and dignify the historical context of the community?s customs and folklore as they manifest themselves in both the public and private square. They range from intimate forms of cultural camaraderie such as games of dominoes in dimly lit social clubs to expansive parades where the full kinetic force of our idiosyncrasies are on full display, celebrating our cultural offerings including art, music, dance, and religious festivities. These tapestries are the raw material of my creative expression and life-long work. ?La Cultura Vive, y Su Historia Sigue.?

 

Edwin Pag?n is a New York-based photographer, filmmaker, cinematographer, curator, and cultural activist with a rare blend of creative and administrative experience including more than twenty-five years in community organizing, as well as extensive production experience in the documentary and narrative film sectors.

 

Pag?n has worked extensively as an arts technical assistance provider at Bronx Council on the Arts, IFP Market & Conference, Association of Hispanic Arts, and Black Filmmaker Foundation, and has served on the board of directors of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP) and Hispanic Organization Latino Actors (HOLA). He has also served on numerous juries and selection committees for the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA), NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA), New York International Latino Film Festival and Tribeca Institutes? Tribeca All Access Connects initiative. Pag?n frequently speaks on panels related to filmmaking, particularly the expansion and integration of filmmakers of color into the entertainment industry.

 

For the past fourteen years, Pag?n has curated the NewLatino Filmmakers series at the renowned East Village cinematheque Anthology Film Archives and is a founding member of the acclaimed Seis del Sur photography collective. He currently works as program manager of the Bronx Culture Collective (BxCC) in the South Bronx.

Barrio Art, Music and Popular Culture

The Spirit of East Harlem Mural

| By
Michael Shawn Cordero

The Spirit of East Harlem, E. 104th St. with Lexington Ave.

The Spirit of East Harlem Mural AR project, located on the corner of E. 104th St. with Lexington Ave., features a mural that has survived the elements, a fire and vandals. Each time this mural has been threatened, people have come together to preserve it, this way becoming a symbol of resilience in the community. Through articles, audio tracks and interactive activities that celebrate the residents of El Barrio, viewers will get to know more about the history behind The Spirit of East Harlem mural.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Stand back from the small plaque that is on the wall and stand on the sidewalk somewhat close to the curb. Point the camera at the "El Barrio Tours" portion of the mural. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Michael Shawn Cordero
Michael Shawn Cordero

Michael Shawn Cordero is a multimedia artist from Brooklyn, New York, whose work has been exhibited in New York, Puerto Rico, San Francisco, and Guatemala City. He is a creative agitator who believes in growing community first through education, social equity, and culture. Cordero has launched several successful arts and community-based businesses. He is motivated by the desire to facilitate economic and intellectual opportunities for community around him, especially its youth. With a strong reputation for promoting social, political, and cultural awareness to provoke change, his focus is primarily on using art and entrepreneurship to raise consciousness in the community.

Cordero has been a teaching artist with Urban Arts Partnership (UAP) since January 2008 and has recently become the EdTECH manager there. He has also designed and coordinated numerous youth-based art programs at UAP. His students? award-winning work has been featured in numerous film festivals and youth media conferences.

Barrio Art, Music and Popular Culture

Monique?s 108 Lounge

| By
Bianca DeJesus

Monique?s 108 Lounge, 181 E. 108th St.

Monique?s 108 Lounge: This place is known to be a spot for people to congregate to dance and watch live performances of Latino music. It is also a popular meeting place for people during the Puerto Rican festival and parade. I would like to talk about this venue as having a value within the community but also to tell the story of trying to maintain a culturally rich location when gentrification is on the rise and closing is a constant threat. I have access to the owner and will talk to him about the project and ask what he would like to be included in the augment as well (to see what will benefit the lounge the most).

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Stand on the curb and point at the large purple mural. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Bianca DeJesus
Bianca DeJesus

Bianca DeJesus was born and raised in the Bronx, New York. She is Puerto Rican and Dominican but identifies with all of the Caribbean and other places of the African diaspora; consequently, she is very much a student of the world. DeJesus?s work often addresses the complex issues of power, romance, ?race,? gender, colorism, and body image, and the relationships among people, their words, and their surroundings. She intends her art to convey vivid emotions that evoke a line of questioning. Her academic background is in writing, and poetry plays a part in everything she does, as does the idea of having a ?story.? DeJesus wants her work to uplift rather than to condemn, and to draw attention to those who are often overlooked, utilizing the literary idea of magic realism. She draws inspiration from her ancestors as well as from strangers and family members she observes.

 

DeJesus attended a small liberal-arts college in Baltimore, Maryland, where she was introduced to the art of collage and began to explore drawing and watercolor. She graduated with a B.A. in English, minoring in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies as well as Africana Studies. Bianca is now pursuing her M.A. in New York. She recalls visiting the islands of Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic as a child and feeling an intense connection to those places as being her true home, although she never lived there. Her Mi Querido Barrio ?augmented reality? project is a physical manifestation of that bond, focusing on the brightness and perseverance of the individual faced with a neighborhood?s gentrification.

Barrio Art, Music and Popular Culture

?Qu? arte en El Barrio!

| By
Mariona Lloreta

Julia de Burgos Performance and Arts Center (formerly known as Julia de Burgos Cultural Center), 1680 Lexington Ave.

?Qu? arte en El Barrio!, located in the front doors of Julia de Burgos Performance and Arts Center, offers a number of interactive activities that highlight this location as one of East Harlem?s cultural art hubs. Through games and images, ?Qu? arte en El Barrio! AR project invites viewers to join in a celebration of El Barrio?s cultural legacy. At the same time, the artist aims to showcases Julia de Burgos Performance and Arts Center as one of the many institutions that throughout the years have supported the community as it continues to develop its unique identity.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Stand on the curb and point at the large purple mural. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Mariona Lloreta
Mariona Lloreta

Mariona Lloreta is a visual artist and film director currently based in Brooklyn, New York; she is originally from Barcelona, Spain, and has North African roots. Lloreta has worked and lived in various countries, including Nigeria, Brazil, China, Italy, and the United States, with the goal of documenting cultures around the world while exploring the complexities of identity and heritage. Working as a visual artist, Lloreta hopes to become a leader in the quest to enact positive change through the arts. She seeks to transcend the differences among people and celebrate the universal thread that binds our human experience?to find a common ground across and within cultures, races, and gender to capture experiences that we all relate to, conveying a sense of Oneness and celebrating and honoring our individual and collective stories.

 

Among her recent projects are two short films:  Sankofa: Part I (2015) takes as its subject a woman in Ghana who bleaches her skin to be more accepted by society, and by doing so deals with issues of identity, race, and the social repercussions of colonization. Amenze, Entre Dois Mundos (2016),  explores the interrelationships between an African woman who has newly arrived in Brazil and her surroundings, reflecting on themes of belonging, foreignness, migration, identity, and alienation She has also recently created a series of mixed-media works, Naija Nights, which evokes the beauty that Lloreta encountered as she traveled in Nigeria for two years.

Barrio Art, Music and Popular Culture

Dominoes/El Club

| By
Edwin Pag

Democratic Club of El Barrio, 177 E 110th St.

 

Dominoes/El Club, located at the Democratic Club of El Barrio, features two Puerto Rican/Nuyorican cultural pastimes: the communal act of socializing in community-based clubs, and the game of dominoes. But more than a pastime, both activities have been historically connected in helping to build a common communal bridge during times of severe transition, cultural anxiety, and displacement. Through photographs and audio tracks, viewers will have exclusive access to this intimate, but very welcoming, space.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Stand between the steps on either side of the door, taking a step slightly closer if needed to frame the black door. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Edwin Pag
Edwin Pag

?Over the last thirty years, my creative focus working as a photojournalist, documentary photographer, and graphic designer has been on documenting common communal experiences, especially those customs that are on the verge of disappearing from the cultural fabric of the community as a result of changing regional economic and racial demographics, due to the original influx of forced migration or the current-day exodus as a result of gentrification.

Starting in the South Bronx in the 1980s, and continuing today in Spanish Harlem, I have been assessing the historical and cultural inventory in these two communities through my visual work from an insider?s point-of-view via a process I call ?Cultural Identity Reclamation.? The goal of this work is to validate, solidify, and dignify the historical context of the community?s customs and folklore as they manifest themselves in both the public and private square. They range from intimate forms of cultural camaraderie such as games of dominoes in dimly lit social clubs to expansive parades where the full kinetic force of our idiosyncrasies are on full display, celebrating our cultural offerings including art, music, dance, and religious festivities. These tapestries are the raw material of my creative expression and life-long work. ?La Cultura Vive, y Su Historia Sigue.?

 

Edwin Pag?n is a New York-based photographer, filmmaker, cinematographer, curator, and cultural activist with a rare blend of creative and administrative experience including more than twenty-five years in community organizing, as well as extensive production experience in the documentary and narrative film sectors.

 

Pag?n has worked extensively as an arts technical assistance provider at Bronx Council on the Arts, IFP Market & Conference, Association of Hispanic Arts, and Black Filmmaker Foundation, and has served on the board of directors of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP) and Hispanic Organization Latino Actors (HOLA). He has also served on numerous juries and selection committees for the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA), NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA), New York International Latino Film Festival and Tribeca Institutes? Tribeca All Access Connects initiative. Pag?n frequently speaks on panels related to filmmaking, particularly the expansion and integration of filmmakers of color into the entertainment industry.

 

For the past fourteen years, Pag?n has curated the NewLatino Filmmakers series at the renowned East Village cinematheque Anthology Film Archives and is a founding member of the acclaimed Seis del Sur photography collective. He currently works as program manager of the Bronx Culture Collective (BxCC) in the South Bronx.

Barrio Art, Music and Popular Culture

Soldaderas Mural

| By
Yasm?n Hern?ndez

The Modesto Flores Garden

Lexington Ave. between E. 104th and 105th Streets

 

Soldaderas Mural features Ramirez? Soldaderas mural of Frida Kahlo and Julia de Burgos located in the Modesto Flores Community Garden on Lexington Avenue. Through video clips and images, Soldaderas Mural provides viewers with interactive media content about the lives and works of these two amazing artists, who also happened to be ?guerreras? (women warriors) of their times. Both the physical mural and AR Soldaderas Mural project, honor the common histories and struggles of Mexicans and Puerto Ricans and is a call for continued and increased solidarity between the two communities in El Barrio and abroad.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: : If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Yasmin Hernandez
Yasm?n Hern?ndez

?Liberation is the pulse of my artistic practice. My work is informed by Puerto Rico's experience as a colony subjected to socio-political, industrial, medical, military, and environmental exploitation. Born and raised in Brooklyn, I had a third-party relationship with Puerto Rico through my parents. In my teens, I found art as a space to negotiate and reclaim a nebulous identity and history. As an adult, I traveled to the island more. Listening to the land took me beyond political dialogues and into a profound liberation consciousness. My trips to Vieques Island?s bioluminescent bay, studying its phenomena of light, revealed reflections of the cosmos and the magic of the aurora. I understood how my indigenous ancestors saw the night sky in the ocean, and vice versa. Painting bioluminescence, solar flares, and nebulae, I am able to explore the visual essence of fluido and the idea that spirits, living things, and celestial bodies consist of a universal fluid or light energy. Ever-inspired by its teachings, in 2014 I moved to Borik?n?a land pulsating with ancient wisdom and that lives liberated regardless of the man-made political constructs superimposed over her truth. I build my life and work in her example.?

 

Yasm?n Hern?ndez was born and raised in Brooklyn to parents from Ponce, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico?s struggle against colonialism, and the pursuit of liberation globally, have informed her work over the last twenty years. Her 2011 East Harlem mural Soldaderas honors painter Frida Kahlo and poet Julia de Burgos, inspiring continued solidarity between the Mexican/Chicanx and Puerto Rican communities. Since moving from New York City to Puerto Rico in 2014, her work has been centered on restoring Borik?n to a liberated state through more spiritual, holistic, sustainable practices as taught by her ancestors. Her art has been supported by the National Association of Latino Arts and Culture, the Puffin Foundation, and the Center for Puerto Rican Studies. Yasmin studied art at the LaGuardia High School of the Arts and Cornell University in New York. She has worked as an artist educator with the Studio Museum in Harlem and El Museo del Barrio in New York City and Taller Puertorrique?o in Philadelphia. Today, Yasmin runs an art studio and hosts art classes for women from her hilltop home in Moca, and she also works as a K-12 art teacher in Aguadilla.

Barrio Art, Music and Popular Culture

La Marqueta Time Machine

| By
Alejandro Epifania

La Marqueta, 1607 Park Ave, New York, NY 10029

La Marqueta Time Machine AR project, located inside El Barrio?s La Marqueta, was originally developed by Maria de Mater O'Neill and Alejandro Epifanio for the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute's "Mi Querido Barrio" Augmented Reality Exhibition. The AR installation features a  fruit vendor cart, created by Epifanio, that showcases digital content from the original concept. The fruit vendor cart will act as the "time machine" to connect different food markets of Puerto Rico to "La Marqueta" in El Barrio, then and now. La Marqueta Time Machine will give viewers an interactive experience that will provide a perspective into how these multicultural food markets play an important role in creating and serving our community.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Choose a photo from the fruit vendor cart to scan with the Blippar app. Close and repeat for each picture of the installation to view content. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Alejandro Epifanio
Alejandro Epifania

Alejandro Epifanio, born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, is a multifaceted artist?sculptor, painter, printmaker?as well as a designer and curator; he received his B.F.A. in Fine Arts from the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan. His work focuses on the physical and metaphysical nexus of the arts and its surrounding community. For more than ten years, he has remained close to the Lower East Side, Spanish Harlem, and South Bronx communities of New York City. His work constantly investigates the ideas of peace, tolerance, and unity or of displacement and abandonment. He continues to explore the possibilities offered by different mediums to inform a sensorial language.

 

His ?augmented reality? work in this exhibition, La Marqueta Time Machine, features an AR food vendor cart that displays and connects different food markets of New York City and Puerto Rico, then and now. Through videos, photographs, and texts containing information, La Marqueta Time Machine provides viewers with a visual and interactive experience that will expand their knowledge of the positive role these markets play in creating a sense of community, enriching our culture, and serving the residents as well as the many visitors who come here.

Events

TEST

TEST

FREE

TEST

Events

AFTER AFROPOLITAN | EXHIBITION, CONFERENCE, PERFORMANCES

AFTER AFROPOLITAN | EXHIBITION, CONFERENCE, PERFORMANCES

In Partnership with AfriPOP! And Weeksville Heritage Center

Exhibition On View: February 4 to March 14, 2015

Conference on February 21st, 12 - 8pm

After Afropolitan Exhibition & Conference brought authors, journalists performers, scholars, artists that are actively pushing the boundaries on how we think of the global African Diaspora, past, present, and future in one vibrant days of performances, screenings, and interactive panel discussions.

Become a member
Join today!
Volunteer with CCCADI
Learn more