Homage to EI Barrio's Afro-Latinx Ancestors

Bateyes II

| By
Yasm?n Hern?ndez

Museo Del Barrio, 1230 5th Ave.

Bateyes II AR project features El Museo Del Barrio front yard as one of the spaces where during the summer the Latino community gathers to enjoy of monthly family outdoors events.
For this project the artist uses augmented reality to digitally recreate a Taino ceremonial plaza (commonly known as batey) over this contemporary urban courtyard. Bateyes II will reveal to the viewer aspects of the cultural heritage of El Barrio?s community, as well as the architectural and planning heritage that informed the layout of our communities and public spaces over time and how we still use these today. According to the artist, this project aims at encourage viewers to consider the following questions: How do spaces carry ancestral memories?

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Reference image of marker for positioning. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Yasm?n Hern?ndez
Yasm?n Hern?ndez

?Liberation is the pulse of my artistic practice. My work is informed by Puerto Rico's experience as a colony subjected to socio-political, industrial, medical, military, and environmental exploitation. Born and raised in Brooklyn, I had a third-party relationship with Puerto Rico through my parents. In my teens, I found art as a space to negotiate and reclaim a nebulous identity and history. As an adult, I traveled to the island more. Listening to the land took me beyond political dialogues and into a profound liberation consciousness. My trips to Vieques Island?s bioluminescent bay, studying its phenomena of light, revealed reflections of the cosmos and the magic of the aurora. I understood how my indigenous ancestors saw the night sky in the ocean, and vice versa. Painting bioluminescence, solar flares, and nebulae, I am able to explore the visual essence of fluido and the idea that spirits, living things, and celestial bodies consist of a universal fluid or light energy. Ever-inspired by its teachings, in 2014 I moved to Borik?n?a land pulsating with ancient wisdom and that lives liberated regardless of the man-made political constructs superimposed over her truth. I build my life and work in her example.?

Yasm?n Hern?ndez was born and raised in Brooklyn to parents from Ponce, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico?s struggle against colonialism, and the pursuit of liberation globally, have informed her work over the last twenty years. Her 2011 East Harlem mural Soldaderas honors painter Frida Kahlo and poet Julia de Burgos, inspiring continued solidarity between the Mexican/Chicanx and Puerto Rican communities. Since moving from New York City to Puerto Rico in 2014, her work has been centered on restoring Borik?n to a liberated state through more spiritual, holistic, sustainable practices as taught by her ancestors. Her art has been supported by the National Association of Latino Arts and Culture, the Puffin Foundation, and the Center for Puerto Rican Studies. Yasmin studied art at the LaGuardia High School of the Arts and Cornell University in New York. She has worked as an artist educator with the Studio Museum in Harlem and El Museo del Barrio in New York City and Taller Puertorrique?o in Philadelphia. Today, Yasmin runs an art studio and hosts art classes for women from her hilltop home in Moca, and she also works as a K-12 art teacher in Aguadilla.

Homage to EI Barrio's Afro-Latinx Ancestors

Bateyes I

| By
Yasmin Hernandez

Taino Towers courtyards, 221 E. 122nd St.

Bateyes I AR project features Taino Towers. Named after the Taino, the indigenous people of Puerto Rico (and also of Cuba, Jamaica, and Hispaniola), this building is one of the last large-scale, state-guaranteed affordable-housing complexes to have been constructed in East Harlem. In contrast to the cramped quarters that typically exist in New York?s public housing ?projects,? amenities in Taino Towers apartments include ample living space, high ceilings, picture windows, and balconies. For this project the artist uses augmented reality to digitally recreate a Taino ceremonial plaza (commonly known as batey) over this contemporary urban courtyard. Bateyes I will reveal to the viewer aspects of the cultural heritage of El Barrio?s community, as well as the architectural and planning heritage that informed the layout of our communities and public spaces over time and how we still use these today. According to the artist, this project aims at encouraging viewers to consider the following questions: How do spaces carry ancestral memories?

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Stand in front of the security checkpoint and point at the ?Taino Towers? sign. Reference image of marker for positioning. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Yasmin Hernandez
Yasmin Hernandez

?Liberation is the pulse of my artistic practice. My work is informed by Puerto Rico's experience as a colony subjected to socio-political, industrial, medical, military, and environmental exploitation. Born and raised in Brooklyn, I had a third-party relationship with Puerto Rico through my parents. In my teens, I found art as a space to negotiate and reclaim a nebulous identity and history. As an adult, I traveled to the island more. Listening to the land took me beyond political dialogues and into a profound liberation consciousness. My trips to Vieques Island?s bioluminescent bay, studying its phenomena of light, revealed reflections of the cosmos and the magic of the aurora. I understood how my indigenous ancestors saw the night sky in the ocean, and vice versa. Painting bioluminescence, solar flares, and nebulae, I am able to explore the visual essence of fluido and the idea that spirits, living things, and celestial bodies consist of a universal fluid or light energy. Ever-inspired by its teachings, in 2014 I moved to Borik?n?a land pulsating with ancient wisdom and that lives liberated regardless of the man-made political constructs superimposed over her truth. I build my life and work in her example.?

Yasm?n Hern?ndez was born and raised in Brooklyn to parents from Ponce, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico?s struggle against colonialism, and the pursuit of liberation globally, have informed her work over the last twenty years. Her 2011 East Harlem mural Soldaderas honors painter Frida Kahlo and poet Julia de Burgos, inspiring continued solidarity between the Mexican/Chicanx and Puerto Rican communities. Since moving from New York City to Puerto Rico in 2014, her work has been centered on restoring Borik?n to a liberated state through more spiritual, holistic, sustainable practices as taught by her ancestors. Her art has been supported by the National Association of Latino Arts and Culture, the Puffin Foundation, and the Center for Puerto Rican Studies. Yasmin studied art at the LaGuardia High School of the Arts and Cornell University in New York. She has worked as an artist educator with the Studio Museum in Harlem and El Museo del Barrio in New York City and Taller Puertorrique?o in Philadelphia. Today, Yasmin runs an art studio and hosts art classes for women from her hilltop home in Moca, and she also works as a K-12 art teacher in Aguadilla.

Homage to EI Barrio's Afro-Latinx Ancestors

Nine Nights: African Burial Ground, 126th E. Street

| By
Kearra Amaya Gopee

E. 126th Street Bus Depot

Nine Nights: African Burial Ground, 126th E. Street AR project features East Harlem?s African Burial Ground, located at the East 126th Street Bus Depot. Though not as large or as well known as the one in Lower Manhattan just north of City Hall, this Burial Ground is a site where peoples of African descent from all over Manhattan were buried during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In 1665, the Dutch Reformed Church of Harlem erected a church building at the corner of First Avenue and 127th E. St., making it the oldest formal church in Harlem. A quarter acre of land around the church was set aside and became known as the ?Negro Burying Ground.? In timens when the deaths of black people have become a spectacle in the digital era, Nine Nights: African Burial Ground, 126th E. Street utilizes augmented reality to provide the viewers with a more private and intimate space to mourn. Nine Nights: African Burial Ground, 126th E. Street AR project is inspired by ?Nine Nights,? the Caribbean mourning tradition where people gather at the home of the deceased for nine nights before the burial.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: To experience this augment correctly, the markers must be scanned in the order presented. When standing in front of the building, the first marker is situated at the right side of the building and from there, you must walk around the periphery, searching for the remaining markers and answering the prompts as they appear. Close the augment by tapping the ?X? icon in the far right corner of the screen, before activating the next marker. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Kearra Amaya Gopee
Kearra Amaya Gopee

Kearra Amaya Gopee is a Trinidadian documentary photographer and visual artist, who since the age of eighteen has been based in Brooklyn, New York. Born in Miami-Dade County, Florida, to Trinidadian parents, she moved when she was three to her maternal family?s home in Carapichaima, Trinidad and Tobago. When she was seventeen, she was hired to work as a photographer for the Trinidad Guardian, Trinidad and Tobago?s oldest newspaper. During her time there, she discovered her affinity for research and documentation, which is now an integral part of her practice. She recently presented work at the Caribbean Studies Association conference in Haiti, as well as having been part of group exhibitions at Alice Yard, Trinidad and Tobago, the Ludwig Foundation of Cuba, and UFES Gallery in Vit?ria, Brazil.

Her work varies in subject matter and form but mostly focuses on the nature of violence and erasure inflicted on the Caribbean by the global north. She has also been heavily influenced by studies of the infrapolitical action undertaken by the women in her own family. Seeing beauty and master craftsmanship in the daily activities of these women has led her to appreciate the power of processes and the place of invisible labor, especially in the construction of the home and, by extension, in the post-colonial Caribbean region.

Homage to EI Barrio's Afro-Latinx Ancestors

The Blessed Ancestors Are Among Us

| By
Mariona Lloreta

National Black Theatre, 2031 5th Ave.

The Blessed Ancestors Are Among Us AR project features the National Black Theatre, which is housed in a beautiful building covered in relief art created by traditional artists from Osogbo, Nigeria. The Theatre has been a leader in promoting art from the African diaspora since 1968. Through a series of experimental short videos, the viewers will be immersed in an interactive experience that aims at inspiring them to reconnect and honor the ancestors among us, the essence of those who are no longer here but whose energy embraces and propels us in our lives.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Stand on the curb and aim at the upper stories of the National Black Theatre building. Tap on the screen to go back to the menu. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Mariona Lloreta
Mariona Lloreta

Mariona Lloreta is a visual artist and film director currently based in Brooklyn, New York; she is originally from Barcelona, Spain, and has North African roots. Lloreta has worked and lived in various countries, including Nigeria, Brazil, China, Italy, and the United States, with the goal of documenting cultures around the world while exploring the complexities of identity and heritage. Working as a visual artist, Lloreta hopes to become a leader in the quest to enact positive change through the arts. She seeks to transcend the differences among people and celebrate the universal thread that binds our human experience?to find a common ground across and within cultures, races, and gender to capture experiences that we all relate to, conveying a sense of Oneness and celebrating and honoring our individual and collective stories.

Among her recent projects are two short films:  Sankofa: Part I (2015) takes as its subject a woman in Ghana who bleaches her skin to be more accepted by society, and by doing so deals with issues of identity, race, and the social repercussions of colonization. Amenze, Entre Dois Mundos (2016),  explores the interrelationships between an African woman who has newly arrived in Brazil and her surroundings, reflecting on themes of belonging, foreignness, migration, identity, and alienation She has also recently created a series of mixed-media works, Naija Nights, which evokes the beauty that Lloreta encountered as she traveled in Nigeria for two years.

Legacies of Community Activism

Memorial Murals of the 1990s: Che Memorial Mural

| By
Oliver Rios

2168 E. 118th St. (between Lexington and 3rd Ave.)
(painted by: Oliver Rios and Luis Martinez, 1991)

Memorial Mural of the 1990s: Chino Chang Memorial Mural AR project is part of Rios? Popular Murals of the 1990s series included in CCCADI?s Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Exhibition & Tour. The series features East Harlem?s memorial murals of the 1990s dedicated to the community members killed by drug and gun violence. As a resident of the neighborhood, spray can artist Oliver Rios collaborated with local artist to paint positive murals and help spread awareness along the streets.These murals are now resurrected on the streets of El Barrio with the help of augmented reality technology.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Stand close enough to frame the green sprinkler. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Oliver Rios
Oliver Rios

?As a muralist who grew up in East Harlem from the 1970s to the 2000s, I was inspired by hip-hop culture and the diversity that surrounded me every day. Before it was called Street Art, Spray Can Art helped me to express myself and strive in the neighborhood I call El Barrio. By collaborating with artists in the community and painting memorial murals to remember those we lost, I found my purpose. I felt a responsibility to give those who died a voice, by creating a mural. I was also inspired to make a difference in the community by raising awareness through my art. My first collaborative mural was Drugs End All Dreams (D.E.A.D.), an anti-drug mural painted in 1991 to help educate residents about the destruction caused by drug abuse. Since that time, I have always felt that my art can bring awareness about issues that affect us today. I thank Dr. Marta Moreno Vega and CCCADI for collaborating with me on this project. I dedicate my works in this exhibition to my parents and all my brothers and sisters I have met along the way from Mi Querido Barrio.?

Oliver Rios, born to Puerto Rican parents and raised in El Barrio, is a visual artist who is committed to raising awareness. His innovative and artistic technique empowers his creativity daily. His anti-violence murals and memorial murals helped bring awareness to Spanish Harlem in the early 1990s. He learned to airbrush his images and designs on T-shirts, and he painted storefronts for local businesses. This planted the seed of entrepreneurship in him. He attended the Art and Design High School and City Tech (New York City College of Technology), both in New York, majoring in art and advertising design. Rios continues to document the changing neighborhood of East Harlem with the use of both traditional and digital photography. His passion and creativity have supported his career in fashion photography, editorial photography, advertising design, and digital art. As the founder of Orios Designs and as a creative consultant, he continues to develop cutting-edge ideas that help generate positive results. His mission is to create uplifting and meaningful images through photography, visual design, and typography, striving to inspire the human spirit.

Legacies of Community Activism

Memorial Murals of the 1990s: Tee Memorial Mural

| By
Oliver Rios

180 E. 118th St.
(painted by: Oliver Rios, Jose Cordero, and Julio Caban, 1992)

Memorial Murals of the 1990s: Tee Memorial Mural is part of Rios? Popular Murals of the 1990s series included in CCCADI?s Mi Querido Barrio: Augmented Reality Exhibition & Tour. The series features East Harlem?s memorial murals of the 1990s dedicated to the community members killed by drug and gun violence. As a resident of the neighborhood, spray can artist Oliver Rios collaborated with local artist to paint positive murals and help spread awareness along the streets.These murals are now resurrected on the streets of El Barrio with the help of augmented reality technology.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Stand close enough to frame the mural. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Oliver Rios
Oliver Rios

?As a muralist who grew up in East Harlem from the 1970s to the 2000s, I was inspired by hip-hop culture and the diversity that surrounded me every day. Before it was called Street Art, Spray Can Art helped me to express myself and strive in the neighborhood I call El Barrio. By collaborating with artists in the community and painting memorial murals to remember those we lost, I found my purpose. I felt a responsibility to give those who died a voice, by creating a mural. I was also inspired to make a difference in the community by raising awareness through my art. My first collaborative mural was Drugs End All Dreams (D.E.A.D.), an anti-drug mural painted in 1991 to help educate residents about the destruction caused by drug abuse. Since that time, I have always felt that my art can bring awareness about issues that affect us today. I thank Dr. Marta Moreno Vega and CCCADI for collaborating with me on this project. I dedicate my works in this exhibition to my parents and all my brothers and sisters I have met along the way from Mi Querido Barrio.?

Oliver Rios, born to Puerto Rican parents and raised in El Barrio, is a visual artist who is committed to raising awareness. His innovative and artistic technique empowers his creativity daily. His anti-violence murals and memorial murals helped bring awareness to Spanish Harlem in the early 1990s. He learned to airbrush his images and designs on T-shirts, and he painted storefronts for local businesses. This planted the seed of entrepreneurship in him. He attended the Art and Design High School and City Tech (New York City College of Technology), both in New York, majoring in art and advertising design. Rios continues to document the changing neighborhood of East Harlem with the use of both traditional and digital photography. His passion and creativity have supported his career in fashion photography, editorial photography, advertising design, and digital art. As the founder of Orios Designs and as a creative consultant, he continues to develop cutting-edge ideas that help generate positive results. His mission is to create uplifting and meaningful images through photography, visual design, and typography, striving to inspire the human spirit.

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