Legacies of Community Activism

Memorial Murals of the 1990s: Chino Chang Memorial Mural

| By
Oliver Rios

165 E. 118th St.
(painted by: Oliver Rios)

Memorial Murals of the 1990s: Chino Chang Memorial Mural AR project  is part of Rios? Popular Murals of the 1990s series included in CCCADI?s Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Exhibition & Tour. The series features East Harlem?s memorial murals of the 1990?s dedicated to the community members killed by drug and gun violence. As a resident of the neighborhood, spray can artist Oliver Rios collaborated with local artist to paint positive murals and help spread awareness along the streets.These murals are now resurrected on the streets of El Barrio with the aid of augmented reality.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Stand on the curb and frame the rolling gate. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Oliver Rios
Oliver Rios

?As a muralist who grew up in East Harlem from the 1970s to the 2000s, I was inspired by hip-hop culture and the diversity that surrounded me every day. Before it was called Street Art, Spray Can Art helped me to express myself and strive in the neighborhood I call El Barrio. By collaborating with artists in the community and painting memorial murals to remember those we lost, I found my purpose. I felt a responsibility to give those who died a voice, by creating a mural. I was also inspired to make a difference in the community by raising awareness through my art. My first collaborative mural was Drugs End All Dreams (D.E.A.D.), an anti-drug mural painted in 1991 to help educate residents about the destruction caused by drug abuse. Since that time, I have always felt that my art can bring awareness about issues that affect us today. I thank Dr. Marta Moreno Vega and CCCADI for collaborating with me on this project. I dedicate my works in this exhibition to my parents and all my brothers and sisters I have met along the way from Mi Querido Barrio.?

Oliver Rios, born to Puerto Rican parents and raised in El Barrio, is a visual artist who is committed to raising awareness. His innovative and artistic technique empowers his creativity daily. His anti-violence murals and memorial murals helped bring awareness to Spanish Harlem in the early 1990s. He learned to airbrush his images and designs on T-shirts, and he painted storefronts for local businesses. This planted the seed of entrepreneurship in him. He attended the Art and Design High School and City Tech (New York City College of Technology), both in New York, majoring in art and advertising design. Rios continues to document the changing neighborhood of East Harlem with the use of both traditional and digital photography. His passion and creativity have supported his career in fashion photography, editorial photography, advertising design, and digital art. As the founder of Orios Designs and as a creative consultant, he continues to develop cutting-edge ideas that help generate positive results. His mission is to create uplifting and meaningful images through photography, visual design, and typography, striving to inspire the human spirit.

Legacies of Community Activism

Popular Murals of the 1990s: Mind Over Matter (MOM Wall), Raze Memorial Wall Mural

| By
Oliver Rios

2182 3rd Ave.
(painted by: Oliver Rios, Jose Cordero, Julio Caban)

Popular Murals of the 1990s: Mind Over Matter (MOM Wall), Raze Memorial Wall Mural AR project is part of Rios? Popular Murals of the 1990s series included in CCCADI?s Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Exhibition & Tour. The series features East Harlem?s memorial murals of the 1990s dedicated to the community members killed by drug and gun violence. As a resident of the neighborhood, spray can artist Oliver Rios collaborated with local artist to paint positive murals and help spread awareness along the streets. These murals are now resurrected on the streets of El Barrio with the help of augmented reality technology.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

 

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Reference image of marker #1 for positioning. Marker #2 can be found on E. 118th Street with 3rd Ave. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Oliver Rios
Oliver Rios

?As a muralist who grew up in East Harlem from the 1970s to the 2000s, I was inspired by hip-hop culture and the diversity that surrounded me every day. Before it was called Street Art, Spray Can Art helped me to express myself and strive in the neighborhood I call El Barrio. By collaborating with artists in the community and painting memorial murals to remember those we lost, I found my purpose. I felt a responsibility to give those who died a voice, by creating a mural. I was also inspired to make a difference in the community by raising awareness through my art. My first collaborative mural was Drugs End All Dreams (D.E.A.D.), an anti-drug mural painted in 1991 to help educate residents about the destruction caused by drug abuse. Since that time, I have always felt that my art can bring awareness about issues that affect us today. I thank Dr. Marta Moreno Vega and CCCADI for collaborating with me on this project. I dedicate my works in this exhibition to my parents and all my brothers and sisters I have met along the way from Mi Querido Barrio.?

Oliver Rios, born to Puerto Rican parents and raised in El Barrio, is a visual artist who is committed to raising awareness. His innovative and artistic technique empowers his creativity daily. His anti-violence murals and memorial murals helped bring awareness to Spanish Harlem in the early 1990s. He learned to airbrush his images and designs on T-shirts, and he painted storefronts for local businesses. This planted the seed of entrepreneurship in him. He attended the Art and Design High School and City Tech (New York City College of Technology), both in New York, majoring in art and advertising design. Rios continues to document the changing neighborhood of East Harlem with the use of both traditional and digital photography. His passion and creativity have supported his career in fashion photography, editorial photography, advertising design, and digital art. As the founder of Orios Designs and as a creative consultant, he continues to develop cutting-edge ideas that help generate positive results. His mission is to create uplifting and meaningful images through photography, visual design, and typography, striving to inspire the human spirit.

Legacies of Community Activism

Popular Murals of the 1990s: Anti-Gun Violence Mural

| By
Oliver Rios

200 E. 118th St.
(gun painted by Oliver Rios / grim reaper by Tito Rolon, 1994)

Popular Murals of the 1990s: Anti-Gun Violence Mural AR project is part of Rios? Popular Murals of the 1990s series included in CCCADI?s Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Exhibition. The series features East Harlem?s memorial murals of the 1990s dedicated to the community members killed by drug and gun violence. As a resident of the neighborhood, spray can artist Oliver Rios collaborated with local artist to paint positive murals and help spread awareness along the streets.These murals are now resurrected on the streets of El Barrio with the help of augmented reality technology.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Reference image of marker for positioning. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Oliver Rios
Oliver Rios

?As a muralist who grew up in East Harlem from the 1970s to the 2000s, I was inspired by hip-hop culture and the diversity that surrounded me every day. Before it was called Street Art, Spray Can Art helped me to express myself and strive in the neighborhood I call El Barrio. By collaborating with artists in the community and painting memorial murals to remember those we lost, I found my purpose. I felt a responsibility to give those who died a voice, by creating a mural. I was also inspired to make a difference in the community by raising awareness through my art. My first collaborative mural was Drugs End All Dreams (D.E.A.D.), an anti-drug mural painted in 1991 to help educate residents about the destruction caused by drug abuse. Since that time, I have always felt that my art can bring awareness about issues that affect us today. I thank Dr. Marta Moreno Vega and CCCADI for collaborating with me on this project. I dedicate my works in this exhibition to my parents and all my brothers and sisters I have met along the way from Mi Querido Barrio.?

Oliver Rios, born to Puerto Rican parents and raised in El Barrio, is a visual artist who is committed to raising awareness. His innovative and artistic technique empowers his creativity daily. His anti-violence murals and memorial murals helped bring awareness to Spanish Harlem in the early 1990s. He learned to airbrush his images and designs on T-shirts, and he painted storefronts for local businesses. This planted the seed of entrepreneurship in him. He attended the Art and Design High School and City Tech (New York City College of Technology), both in New York, majoring in art and advertising design. Rios continues to document the changing neighborhood of East Harlem with the use of both traditional and digital photography. His passion and creativity have supported his career in fashion photography, editorial photography, advertising design, and digital art. As the founder of Orios Designs and as a creative consultant, he continues to develop cutting-edge ideas that help generate positive results. His mission is to create uplifting and meaningful images through photography, visual design, and typography, striving to inspire the human spirit.

Legacies of Community Activism

East Harlem Casitas of the 1980s: The Casita

| By
Oliver Rios

121 E. 115th St.

In a special collaboration between Rios and photojournalist Martha Cooper, East Harlem Casitas of the 1980s: The Casita AR project features the ?casitas? in New York City. The ?casitas? were part of almost every empty lot and community garden during the 1980s in El Barrio. They became a cultural oasis to the many Puerto Ricans residing in this neighborhood. Today, very few remain around the City.

East Harlem Casitas of the 1980s: The Casita, Rios used Cooper?s photographs to build the photo galleries that will allow viewers to learn more about how locals gathered around the ?casitas? to enjoy each other?s company. East Harlem Casitas of the 1980s: The Casita AR project is located on 121 E. 115th St., between Lexington and Park avenues.

 East Harlem Casitas of the 1980s: The Casita is part of Rios? East Harlem Casitas of the 1980s series that is part of CCCADI?s Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Exhibition.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Reference image of marker for positioning. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Oliver Rios
Oliver Rios

?As a muralist who grew up in East Harlem from the 1970s to the 2000s, I was inspired by hip-hop culture and the diversity that surrounded me every day. Before it was called Street Art, Spray Can Art helped me to express myself and strive in the neighborhood I call El Barrio. By collaborating with artists in the community and painting memorial murals to remember those we lost, I found my purpose. I felt a responsibility to give those who died a voice, by creating a mural. I was also inspired to make a difference in the community by raising awareness through my art. My first collaborative mural was Drugs End All Dreams (D.E.A.D.), an anti-drug mural painted in 1991 to help educate residents about the destruction caused by drug abuse. Since that time, I have always felt that my art can bring awareness about issues that affect us today. I thank Dr. Marta Moreno Vega and CCCADI for collaborating with me on this project. I dedicate my works in this exhibition to my parents and all my brothers and sisters I have met along the way from Mi Querido Barrio.?

Oliver Rios, born to Puerto Rican parents and raised in El Barrio, is a visual artist who is committed to raising awareness. His innovative and artistic technique empowers his creativity daily. His anti-violence murals and memorial murals helped bring awareness to Spanish Harlem in the early 1990s. He learned to airbrush his images and designs on T-shirts, and he painted storefronts for local businesses. This planted the seed of entrepreneurship in him. He attended the Art and Design High School and City Tech (New York City College of Technology), both in New York, majoring in art and advertising design. Rios continues to document the changing neighborhood of East Harlem with the use of both traditional and digital photography. His passion and creativity have supported his career in fashion photography, editorial photography, advertising design, and digital art. As the founder of Orios Designs and as a creative consultant, he continues to develop cutting-edge ideas that help generate positive results. His mission is to create uplifting and meaningful images through photography, visual design, and typography, striving to inspire the human spirit.

Legacies of Community Activism

East Harlem Casitas of the 1980s: Mi Bohio

| By
Oliver Rios

220 E. 119th St.

In a special collaboration between Rios and photojournalist Martha Cooper, East Harlem Casitas of the 1980s: Mi Bohio AR project features the ?casitas? in New York City. The ?casitas? were part of almost every empty lot and community garden during the 1980s in El Barrio. They became a cultural oasis to the many Puerto Ricans residing in this neighborhood. Today, very few remain around the City.

For East Harlem Casitas of the 1980s: Mi Bohio, Rios used Cooper?s photographs to build the photo galleries that will allow viewers to learn more about how locals gathered around the ?casitas? to enjoy each other?s company. East Harlem Casitas of the 1980s: Mi Bohio AR project can be activated by visiting what today is Papo?s Garden on 220 E. 119th St., between 2nd and 3rd avenues.

East Harlem Casitas of the 1980s: Mi Bohio is part of Rios? East Harlem Casitas of the 1980s series that is part of CCCADI?s Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Exhibition.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Stand close to the entry and frame the door. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Oliver Rios
Oliver Rios

?As a muralist who grew up in East Harlem from the 1970s to the 2000s, I was inspired by hip-hop culture and the diversity that surrounded me every day. Before it was called Street Art, Spray Can Art helped me to express myself and strive in the neighborhood I call El Barrio. By collaborating with artists in the community and painting memorial murals to remember those we lost, I found my purpose. I felt a responsibility to give those who died a voice, by creating a mural. I was also inspired to make a difference in the community by raising awareness through my art. My first collaborative mural was Drugs End All Dreams (D.E.A.D.), an anti-drug mural painted in 1991 to help educate residents about the destruction caused by drug abuse. Since that time, I have always felt that my art can bring awareness about issues that affect us today. I thank Dr. Marta Moreno Vega and CCCADI for collaborating with me on this project. I dedicate my works in this exhibition to my parents and all my brothers and sisters I have met along the way from Mi Querido Barrio.?

Oliver Rios, born to Puerto Rican parents and raised in El Barrio, is a visual artist who is committed to raising awareness. His innovative and artistic technique empowers his creativity daily. His anti-violence murals and memorial murals helped bring awareness to Spanish Harlem in the early 1990s. He learned to airbrush his images and designs on T-shirts, and he painted storefronts for local businesses. This planted the seed of entrepreneurship in him. He attended the Art and Design High School and City Tech (New York City College of Technology), both in New York, majoring in art and advertising design. Rios continues to document the changing neighborhood of East Harlem with the use of both traditional and digital photography. His passion and creativity have supported his career in fashion photography, editorial photography, advertising design, and digital art. As the founder of Orios Designs and as a creative consultant, he continues to develop cutting-edge ideas that help generate positive results. His mission is to create uplifting and meaningful images through photography, visual design, and typography, striving to inspire the human spirit.

Legacies of Community Activism

Nuestra Familia, Nuestro Barrio

| By
Oliver Rios

Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute (CCCADI), 120 E. 125th St.

In a special collaboration between Rios and photojournalist Martha Cooper, Nuestra Familia, Nuestro Barrio AR project features the ?casitas? in New York City. The ?casitas? were part of almost every empty lot and community garden during the 1980s in El Barrio. They became a cultural oasis to the many Puerto Ricans residing in this neighborhood. Today, very few remain around the City.

For Nuestra Familia, Nuestro Barrio augment, Rios used Cooper?s photographs to build the photo galleries that will allow viewers to learn more about how locals gathered around the ?casitas? to enjoy each other?s company. Nuestra Familia, Nuestro Barrio AR project can be activated by visiting CCCADI?s new home on 120 E. 125th St.

Nuestra Familia, Nuestro Barrio is part of Rios? East Harlem Casitas of the 1980s series that he created for CCCADI?s Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Exhibition.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: : If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Oliver Rios
Oliver Rios

?As a muralist who grew up in East Harlem from the 1970s to the 2000s, I was inspired by hip-hop culture and the diversity that surrounded me every day. Before it was called Street Art, Spray Can Art helped me to express myself and strive in the neighborhood I call El Barrio. By collaborating with artists in the community and painting memorial murals to remember those we lost, I found my purpose. I felt a responsibility to give those who died a voice, by creating a mural. I was also inspired to make a difference in the community by raising awareness through my art. My first collaborative mural was Drugs End All Dreams (D.E.A.D.), an anti-drug mural painted in 1991 to help educate residents about the destruction caused by drug abuse. Since that time, I have always felt that my art can bring awareness about issues that affect us today. I thank Dr. Marta Moreno Vega and CCCADI for collaborating with me on this project. I dedicate my works in this exhibition to my parents and all my brothers and sisters I have met along the way from Mi Querido Barrio.?

Oliver Rios, born to Puerto Rican parents and raised in El Barrio, is a visual artist who is committed to raising awareness. His innovative and artistic technique empowers his creativity daily. His anti-violence murals and memorial murals helped bring awareness to Spanish Harlem in the early 1990s. He learned to airbrush his images and designs on T-shirts, and he painted storefronts for local businesses. This planted the seed of entrepreneurship in him. He attended the Art and Design High School and City Tech (New York City College of Technology), both in New York, majoring in art and advertising design. Rios continues to document the changing neighborhood of East Harlem with the use of both traditional and digital photography. His passion and creativity have supported his career in fashion photography, editorial photography, advertising design, and digital art. As the founder of Orios Designs and as a creative consultant, he continues to develop cutting-edge ideas that help generate positive results. His mission is to create uplifting and meaningful images through photography, visual design, and typography, striving to inspire the human spirit.

Legacies of Community Activism

Del Pueblo Restaurant

| By
Oliver Rios

Del Pueblo Restaurant, 2118 3rd Ave.

Del Pueblo Restaurant AR projects features an East Harlem diner that served Spanish cuisine in the early 1970s.  As a part time photography student in New York City, owner Everaldo Rios photo-documented the inside of his restaurant with traditional black and white photography. The original prints have been scanned and enhanced so viewers can time travel to this local eatery through this augment.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: When scanning the marker, try standing at the edge of the fruit stands and aim at the numbers above the door frame. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Oliver Rios
Oliver Rios

?As a muralist who grew up in East Harlem from the 1970s to the 2000s, I was inspired by hip-hop culture and the diversity that surrounded me every day. Before it was called Street Art, Spray Can Art helped me to express myself and strive in the neighborhood I call El Barrio. By collaborating with artists in the community and painting memorial murals to remember those we lost, I found my purpose. I felt a responsibility to give those who died a voice, by creating a mural. I was also inspired to make a difference in the community by raising awareness through my art. My first collaborative mural was Drugs End All Dreams (D.E.A.D.), an anti-drug mural painted in 1991 to help educate residents about the destruction caused by drug abuse. Since that time, I have always felt that my art can bring awareness about issues that affect us today. I thank Dr. Marta Moreno Vega and CCCADI for collaborating with me on this project. I dedicate my works in this exhibition to my parents and all my brothers and sisters I have met along the way from Mi Querido Barrio.?

Oliver Rios, born to Puerto Rican parents and raised in El Barrio, is a visual artist who is committed to raising awareness. His innovative and artistic technique empowers his creativity daily. His anti-violence murals and memorial murals helped bring awareness to Spanish Harlem in the early 1990s. He learned to airbrush his images and designs on T-shirts, and he painted storefronts for local businesses. This planted the seed of entrepreneurship in him. He attended the Art and Design High School and City Tech (New York City College of Technology), both in New York, majoring in art and advertising design. Rios continues to document the changing neighborhood of East Harlem with the use of both traditional and digital photography. His passion and creativity have supported his career in fashion photography, editorial photography, advertising design, and digital art. As the founder of Orios Designs and as a creative consultant, he continues to develop cutting-edge ideas that help generate positive results. His mission is to create uplifting and meaningful images through photography, visual design, and typography, striving to inspire the human spirit.

Legacies of Community Activism

Lydia?s Magic Garden

| By
Oliver Rios

Lydia?s Magic Garden, 100 E. 118th St.

Lydia?s Magic Garden AR project tells the story of a beloved community garden that was started in El Barrio by resident Lydia Roman. When viewers activate this augment in their devices they will learn the history about the garden through photographs that depict the early years of the garden (early 1990s), and throughout its growing seasons up until 2008 when it was taken over by developers and downsized. The photos included in this project have been taken by Lydia Roman and by the artist.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: Lydia?s Magic garden is located closer to 117th E. St. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Legacies of Community Activism

Last Tenant Standing

| By
Andrew J. Padilla

199 E. 109th St.

Last Tenant Standing AR project features Padilla?s short documentary on the story of Raymond Tirado. Tirado is a man that fights to remain in his childhood home located in an East Harlem apartment building, which will be demolished and replaced with a luxury development any time soon.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: To locate marker #1, turn around the corner of E. 109th St., into 3rd Ave. Stand on the curb or as close to the street as possible to frame the doorway with the green scaffolding. Marker #2 has been can be found right across the street from 3rd Ave., behind the Citi Bike station. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Andrew J. Padilla
Andrew J. Padilla

?My family has been in El Barrio for more than sixty years; these roots inspired me to become the artist I am today. My augments are an attempt to hold on to some of the most iconic people and places in El Barrio before real-estate speculation displaces them. Whether or not the residents and small businesses in these augments remain in our neighborhood, the exhibition will memorialize their fight and the legacy they?ve left behind. Viewers of this AR project  are invited to share their stories of struggling and fighting to remain in their Querido Barrio, in hopes that those engaged in this struggle will find each other.

 

That things change is natural; how they change, why they change, who actually leads that change, who benefits, who loses?those are all choices and variables that we can put up a fight to determine. I hope this exhibition will inspire viewers to fight back, build with their neighbors, and decide the fate of their own communities. Our displacement is not inevitable.?

 

Andrew J. Padilla is an award-winning filmmaker, educator, and independent journalist, born and raised in East Harlem. He is currently profiling displacement in the United States through a series of documentary shorts entitled El Barrio Tours: Gentrification USA. From Hostos to Harvard, Andrew has lectured on urban politics across the U.S. His writing has been featured on NPR Latino, and in City Limits, Latino Rebels, and La Respuesta.

Legacies of Community Activism

Justo Bot?nica

| By
Andrew J. Padilla

Justo Bot?nica (Original location), 1642 Lexington Ave.

Justo Bot?nica AR project, features a 7 Eleven that has replaced the storefront where the ?bot?nica? once stood. After many years operating in the neighborhood, along with 5 other small businesses on 104th and Lexington Ave., Justo Bot?nica was given a 30 days notice to vacate. By interacting with this augmented, the artist will share with viewers more information about how the family of the original owner, Justo, is currently working to maintain this business afloat at a different location and in the midst of gentrification.

To learn more about the artists visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

MARKER
INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1. Download the free Blippar app.

STEP 2. Choose an AR site/project from the Mi Querido Barrio map. Once you are at the selected location, identify your marker.

STEP 3. Open the Blippar app in your phone and scan the image or object you wish to activate.

ACTIVATION TIPS.
Wait a bit as you blipp. The content can take a few seconds to load.
Make sure the image/object is well lit, using the flash feature if necessary.
Make sure to hold your device steady as you blipp.
With this particular AR site/project: : Stay on 104th E. St. and look for the red fire hydrant across the street from the 7th Eleven. If you don?t have access to the physical marker, use the image marker on your Mi Querido Barrio Augmented Reality Guide, or visit cccadi.org/miqueridobarrio.

Blippar

Artist
Andrew J. Padilla
Andrew J. Padilla

?My family has been in El Barrio for more than sixty years; these roots inspired me to become the artist I am today. My augments are an attempt to hold on to some of the most iconic people and places in El Barrio before real-estate speculation displaces them. Whether or not the residents and small businesses in these augments remain in our neighborhood, the exhibition will memorialize their fight and the legacy they?ve left behind. Viewers of this AR project  are invited to share their stories of struggling and fighting to remain in their Querido Barrio, in hopes that those engaged in this struggle will find each other.

That things change is natural; how they change, why they change, who actually leads that change, who benefits, who loses?those are all choices and variables that we can put up a fight to determine. I hope this exhibition will inspire viewers to fight back, build with their neighbors, and decide the fate of their own communities. Our displacement is not inevitable.?

Andrew J. Padilla is an award-winning filmmaker, educator, and independent journalist, born and raised in East Harlem. He is currently profiling displacement in the United States through a series of documentary shorts entitled El Barrio Tours: Gentrification USA. From Hostos to Harvard, Andrew has lectured on urban politics across the U.S. His writing has been featured on NPR Latino, and in City Limits, Latino Rebels, and La Respuesta.

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